Marijuana use not associated with mood or anxiety disorders

Marijuana Use badge

A new study shows that marijuana use is not associated with increased risk for developing mood or anxiety disorders, challenging previous studies which found cannabis use associated with increased risk of onset of depression, anxiety, bipolar disorder, and psychosis.

The study has been published in JAMA Psychiatry, and is the first US nation-wide research to prospectively examine the association between cannabis use and the prevalence and incidence of other mood, anxiety, and substance use disorders.

The research shows that marijuana use is not associated with increased risk for developing mood or anxiety disorders, challenging previous studies which found cannabis use associated with increased risk of onset of depression, anxiety, bipolar disorder, and psychosis.

However, the study did find an association between marijuana use and later substance-use disorders, such as abuse of and dependence (as defined by the DSM-IV ) on alcohol, tobacco, marijuana and other drugs.

The study used a nationally representative sample of 34,653 U.S. adults, interviewed three years apart (2001-2004 or 2002-2005), who participated in the National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions.

Read the full study here: JAMA Psychiatry | Cannabis Use and Risk of Psychiatric Disorders:  Prospective Evidence From a US National Longitudinal Study